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Daylesford get-away

Winter time-out in the country heart-land

When your energy levels are low and each day seems the same as the last, it may be time to get-away. A week-end retreat keeps it simple and offers an opportunity to step-back from the race and breath.

The Resting places

Whether in a simple room above the Daylesford Hotel, or an Airbnd off the beaten path; the time away will reignite your dwindling flame with country vitality and charm.

The Charm

The main strip offers cafes for morning coffees and brunch in front of open fires as the cares fall away. Some Tourists come up for Spas and Massages but don’t need them after a day of wondering through antique stores, art galleries and climbing up streets without the visual insult of ‘development’.

The Churches

are located at the top of the climb and few tourists are up early enough for a Sunday service but that won’t stop a charming convert from offering a stranger a lift to the market, when they are only asking for directions.

The Market

Get to know the locals at the farmers market. Few stores have EFTPOS so remember to bring cash and enjoy over-sized samosas, a store devoted to mushrooms, antiques, fresh produce and a yarn with every purchase.

The Train

runs through the market, it is a living museum of leather seats and wooden panels that rattle and rock as it parades through the country side, with city folk smiling by.

The Stops

Cafes spotted throughout the town for an afternoon tea or a glass of wine, many have open fires to warm up by.

The Gardens

on top of the hill offer botanic country paths to meander

and places to sit and ponder.

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The Field re-visited

‘Summing them up as morbid or deathly, but their very primitiveness, their sledge hammer effects, reinforce this mentally; naked extreme art’

Profoundly Art-Critic G.R.Lansell is describing Peter Booths early ‘Field’ work, a slate of black and grey on a minimalist canvas however he could have been describing his later dramatic figurative art.

Although the artist’s work morphed into an entirely different style, the essence of the artist’s style was conceived.

The Field exhibition launched Melbourne’s art scene in 1968 however it was not fully embraced by the locals.

The battle between Figurative Art that was the flagship of the Melbourne art tribes such as the Reed’s at Hiede and the Boyd’s at Murumbeena, had rallied against the American influence of the exhibition. At the time the exhibition was not organically Melbourne, nor was it entirely ‘International’.

The New York art critic Clement Greenberg criticised the first NGV Contemporary exhibition as ‘ second-rate.’

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The exhibition aimed at awakening a sleepy town, after the failure of the 1956 Gallery of Contemporary Art. The new NGV curator John Stringer thrust his ideas forward and imposed his stipulations on the artists; they were happy to comply as careers and reputations were being made.

In today’s climate the work stands the test of time but to mark the journey of the Abstract Movement there is no greater example than Ron Robertson’s ‘Vault’.

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The Vault 1978

The Vault was placed in the City Square in  1980, twelve years after the exhibition but the local reaction marks the cultural journey of Melbourne. The sculpture received such disfavour that it was nicknamed the ‘Yellow Peril’ by journalists and removed from its place due to public demand. It was a displaced work and was thrown into the shadows until 2002 when it found its home outside the Australian Centre for Contemporary Art.

The art of The Field exhibition sits comfortably within our minimalist technological community . The ideas that may have seemed cold, isolated and sterile during the ‘flower power’ period have a greater relevance in 2018, within a world disconnecting with nature and embracing the virtual.

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The Field Exhibition was the first piece of the NGV journey that began in 1968 and was 50 years before its time.

Banner photo Rolla Scape 1968 Janet Dawson

 

Until Aug 26

Heart, Brains & bit of Courage

Going on an road-trip with a creative mix of travellers always spells adventure but for a girl in red shoes, there’s no place like home.

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The motley crew are seeking self-improvement and what they find are friends. Each is willing to strive and protect the other against an evil force that looms and a Wizard with no wiz. A child’s tale of resilience against formidable stress, twisters, witches, poppies and a dictator. The charming personalities and the innocence of the vulnerable four, warm and lighten the load.

If you loved the Classic, starring Judy Garland you won’t be disappointed with Andrew Lloyd Webbers stage play that surpasses the film, with the enchanting performance and voice of Samantha Dodemaide.

The dramatic effect of the twister at the commencement of the play, packs a powerful punch that keeps the audience attentive. The witches monkeys are superbly frightening and the Wizard is a disturbing ‘Big Brother’ Pscho. It’s the delightful quartet seeking the best of themselves that overcomes the worse of others.

The smallest Star of the Show TOTO played by Trouble &  Flick and trained by Luke Hura added an element of delight that balanced unknown with the safety of home.

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A budding Dorothy with the stars of the show

It’s a brilliant piece of drama, in performance and effects. If your a Wizard of Oz fan that catches  the odd Astor matinee and you don’t have children, take a niece, nephew or  a friend and enjoy.

 

Wizard of OZ written by L.Frank Baum & published in 1900.

REGENT THEATRE

Opening May 12

The Real thing

Era’s pass but genuine Artist’s don’t. Russell Morris’s Music career took off in the 70’s, a politically volatile time of change and youth culture that was spurned on by the Vietnam War. A heartfelt era funnelled through substandard audio; AM radios, record players and cassettes stuffed into dashboards of Holden station-wagons. Pub gigs offered the opportunity for audiences to hear the complete sound and this has not changed. A live gig can make or break a band and Morris hasn’t lost it, in fact he continues to perfect his craft.FullSizeRender-394

On Saturday night at the MEMO music hall, in St Kilda, that was at capacity. A great venue but beware of the nocturnal parking inspectors. Morris was backed by a very funky blues band, the Three Kings that kicked off a the show with a flawless performance that engaged the crowd.

Morris and his band performed their latest work with the Classics. Presently Morris is digging into the roots of our nation whist his earlier work transcended the earthly bonds. Both are distinctively Morris but predictively it was the Sweet, Sweet Love; Wings of an Eagle and The Real Thing that got the crowd to their feet.

Originally it was ‘The Real Thing’ that morphed Morris from Blues Man to Soul Man with the lyrics from Johnny Young and the vision of Molly Meldrum, an Aussie trilogy that blended into a huge hit and became the sound track of the 70’s.

The hit extended beyond our shores to New York and inspired a generation. Young may not have reached his potential heights, but his work soared through Morris to become a classic. Morris found his way and wrote into the hearts of his audience with the Bloodstone Album that included; ‘Wings of an Eagle’ and ‘Sweet, Sweet Love’ and led him into Australia’s ‘Hall of Fame’; archived and ready to be picked up for generations to come.

As a historical twist Russell had offered ‘Sweet , Sweet Love’ to Johnny Farnham but he knocked it back due to the chorus delay, it seems that fate had smiled on Morris and he made it his own. Hits rained on Morris, the type that can stand the test of time. Authenticity and passion distinguished the language of his art, it was unique and distinctive then and remains so today.

Fun times in Melbourne

The Show is back in Town, the Comedy Festival is one of the highlights of the year, after a  Summer of Concerts, Cricket and Tennis; Autumn kicks off with footy and Comic irony.

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Venues pop up all over, utilising theatres, pubs and clubs but demand for space will take the public into the more secretive sites of our town; the Lithuanian Club, the Chinese Museum and the Trades Hall, adding a historic ambiance to the footpath shuffle.

Michael Shafer follows up on his 2017 performance Jewish-ish with this years serving of ‘Kosher Bacon.’  Last year Shafer poked fun of his Jewish roots and this year he combed over, with a classier take in a show that was tight and complete, understanding the muddy shallows of millennium romance. As Shafer’s comic maturity grows, so does his ability to deliver a smooth and complete performance. Laughter rippled over the crowd through-out the entire performance.

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Last years show was from a Gentile perspective and this year he was playing to a home-crowd, but in the final quarter he turned a metamorphic corner in his comic perspective, promising more to come.

“Heartwarming and quirky” Audience member

“This show has established his path, he is way beyond the operational side of things, he’s found his form.” Audience member 

 

KOSHER BACON MICHAEL SHAFER Trades Hall 29 March – April 22, 8:15pm (7:15pm Sun no Wed)

The return of the King

EASTER WEEK

Every one is waiting for the ‘Passover’ in a world preparing for War.

“I’ll be OK!”

Jews and Christians are reminded that the blood of the lamb on the door-post prevented the angel of death from entering. In ancient Egypt, even the Egyptians could protect their Children by this strange act. What guardian can protect the innocent in a Nuclear Age?

The Jews, the Christians, the Secular, the Agnostic and the Pagans can all agree, that the world is limping, threatening to fall-over. Something is wrong. For Christians and Jews, both are expecting the Messiah, very soon. The King is expected to arrive from the East and invite those that are waiting to enter into the gates of heaven, before they are locked.

Fundamentally, the Bible is prophetic, it explains events thousands of years before they begin and most have been fulfilled. The final act takes place in our life-time and the Clock began in WW1.

When Moses (Moshe) was born there was a mass genocide of baby boys to prevent a Hebrew from rising up as a Prince that would divide and ultimately destroy Egypt. Moses introduced humans to a living GOD. When Jesus (Yeshua) was born, there was a genocide  of children under the age of 2 to prevent the birth of King that would divide and ultimately drive the Jews into Diaspora. Jesus led humans into a Spiritual realm where only believers could see or understand. This ‘begs the question’ who were the Nazis trying to stop with the Holocaust in WW2 and why did they call themselves the Third Reich?

In Melbourne the Holy Week for Jews and Christians takes place in Autumn, in the Holy City it is Spring, both herald times of change.

 

‘Like wild animals, they come and devour,

yes, like animals from the forest!

All the Watchmen are blind, they don’t know anything.

They are like watch-dogs that don’t bark

Lying there dreaming, loving to sleep.

Greedy dogs, never satisfied.

These leaders have no understanding

they all turn there own way, each intent on their own advantage.

Come I’ll get some wine, we will be drunk on strong liquor!

Tomorrow will be like today, in fact, it will be even better!

 

Isaiah (Yesha’yahu) 56.9-12

Dramatic portrayal of Revelation

Revelation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bay Life

The rain held off, on Saturday night, as Ormond Point hosted a free outdoor filming, of the bays unknown marine diversity.

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The lights -out, Earth Hour night may have been overshadowed by the Grand Prix and AFL annual kick-off. From the vantage point of the vista, the City never slept and kept its lights on.

Ride on Cinema’ generated a film using pedal-power, a documentary that explained the complex marine-life that lives within our humble Port Philip Bay. Elwood’s symbol of the Seahorse drew from the local under-water life that is populated with the species. Unbeknown to the bathers that have enjoyed the shores this Summer, there are 3 species of Dolphins that call the bay their home

Within the Bay are schools of fish, lazy seals that rest on man-made platforms, sting rays and penguins. Sea-dragons camouflaged as seaweed, suck up shrimp as they pass and thousands of crabs climb over one another, growing out of shells and creating new ones, leaving a trail of skeletons.

“For some its best to hunt alone ..and the best way to get a meal is to hide from it”

Star-gazers bury themselves in the sand and with eyes that float like balloons on strings, watch hungrily for their victims, the razor sharp teeth on top of their head, resemble a bear trap. Large Octopus grab Sharks as they pass by and their miniature counterpart, the Blue Ring kind, kill their prey with venom.

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The Cold waters of the South Pole and the warm waters of our Continent create a habitat that breeds unique marine-life. Protecting and exploring this quiet world is a Melbournian privilege.

Save DeGraves

As developers mow down the remnant of urban culture and bring the suburbs into the urban heartland, the  locals are a tad P.O. Uprooting cottages for flats that look like offices,  speeding down narrow streets where children play and destroying a treasured a metro arcade is ultimately changing Melbourne.

 

Easing through the morning at the DeGraves underpass starts the day off on a ‘good foot’, a coffee, a bit of art and a relaxed vibe. Removing this space from the Urban Art Culture would be like removing the goal posts from the MCG.

The Art Deco architecture of Campbell Arcade embraces Melbourne in1955, the salmon pink tiles, black granite columns capture a by-gone period where few examples remain. The display cabinets along the subway wall host local artists and most often a busker, serenades the office troops, as they pass.

Every morning commuters submerge under the station through Campbell Arcade and surface into DeGraves. What a great way to start the day.

 

Early morning busker

 

 

 

Nightsongs

Life looking back is a vista, a remarkable journey, encumbered,encrusted and inspired; the good,the bad ,the ugly and the beautiful, the footprints the young look upon with indifference, unless it weeps from the tree of integrity.That nectar that inspires trust.

Natasha Moszenin has over 25 years of musical experience that mixes the palette of life and art and delivers a performance at the quaint Butterfly Club that made Friday night fatigue, a soothing recharge.

Moszenin stares unflinching at the drama and terrors of life that hide in the shadows, she has faced them all and knows them by name. With maturity, resilience and defiance, she acknowledges and creates a wonderful score about her life. Ironically the Butterfly Club’s eclectic pictures on the wall illustrate the transformative passage of hope,  love,trauma and …triumph.

The Artists Lara Vocisano, Claie Nicholis and Jai Luke present a narrative through song that washes over the audience. The beautiful voice of Nicholas is of a song-bird but not to take away from the solid vocal presence of Vocisano and Luke, as Moszenin plays the beautiful score on an old piano.

Moszenin dives into the depths and finishes off on a light comment on todays less emotional world.

Nightsongs is performing at the Butterfly Club this weekend

Everything is not as it seems

GOU PEI, Chinese Fabric Artist engineers her Masterpieces, stitch by stitch, bead upon bead, golden thread and a mantle of dreams inspired by an ancient past with dresses that would inspire the Pope. Her exhibit arrived in Melbourne, as precious as the Emperors Palace treasures and is located in the eye of the TRIENNIAL storm at the NGV.

If Melbourne wanted to grab a snatch of the Artistic cyclic pie, they are heading in the right direction. This show stopping art storm is fixated on capturing the Melbourne imagination with no expense spared, and this year it is free.

The journey starts and ends in the Moroccan coffee house but our focus is on the second floor, up the Reko Rennie elevator. From the Australian Aboriginal world, without excess to the pre-communist decadance, up the spine into the heart and soul of the human mind.IMG_1147

Pei claims her work denies what it succumbs to, human vanity. Heart, soul and creativity, with a barrage of craftsmen on the floor, and this has happened before, in Dynasties past, a royal glass slipper for the ball. Rhianna , contemporary Diva, herald in the Artist at the Met Gala, formally the Costume Institute Gala, in New York.

The NGV hive, houses the Queen in an exhibition that begins in a blaze of glory.

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Like Michelangelo, one can imagine that she is ripe for Vatican success.

The NGV has gone wild, Curated by Simon Maidment’s team, a wonderland passing from one installation to another, a mind altering experience of Art.

As art-life drifts out of the fringe into the mainstream an unholy alliance bridges the gap between today and tomorrow. The current stream sedating, a war brewing.

It’s an epic bombardment, a Cultural revolution in it’s full thrust of life bordering on the ruin of decadance. Ron Mueck explores the human condition and its vulnerability in the wake of God-like delusions.

 

Against the odds

How hard is hard? What is our mortal capacity?

Artist, Mel O’Callaghan explores these questions through her dramatic Video Art currently on display at NGV Australia. Resistance and endurance is a rite of passage each of us will pass through eventually, a relative condition at every age.

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Ensemble within the NGV space is cinematic, with life-size actors in a war-like water-battle. O’Callaghan uses the violence of the force to explore existence. It is when we let go  , that life spirals and the body is swept away.

‘What a single body is capable of when enduring a voluntarily experience of duress is a powerful thing to behold’  Callaghan

Australian O’Callaghan lives in Paris and gave a live performance at the Serralves, taking it out of the dark theatre space and into the light of day.

O’Callaghan considers the body as a vehicle of ‘imposed labour’. The resistance of a ballet dancer perhaps or an underpaid worker forcing him/herself out of bed? Consider the Soldier preparing for death, or worse. Each day we battle, not to win, just to remain standing.

‘To fall, to begin again which is where the virtuous aspect comes into violence. It’s not being purely negative but rather a creative force’ O’Callaghan

Her work also relates to the Political and Economic climax point that is coming into focus.

…. those mounting feelings of deep despair that force acts of extremism’

Now showing within the perfect space, the deconstructive architectural venue at Fed. Square.

 

A.Forward

 

 

based on interview with Louise Paramor NGV

The Ritual of Christmas

Christmas and Easter are Celebrated by Christians as holy days, days to give gifts and bond in a deeper humanity. At Christmas pine trees are cut down and decorated, children are taken to a man in a red winter suit and asked if they have been good, wreaths are hung on doors and large legs of ham are served on the day. For lapsed Christians it is an opportunity to return to their childhood church to light candles, say the Lords prayer and sing Silent night.

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In Melbourne it is Summer, full of balmy shopping nights, end of year drinks on roof-top bars and families take their children for the traditional walk down Bourke Street to admire the Myer Christmas window. This year the day may be cooler than hoped for, particularly for those that were planning BBQ’s and picnics however apart from Tasmania, we aren’t expecting snow.

Historically the early Christian’s rose out of Israel and Judah and followed Holy rituals ordained by Yahweh, ‘I am who I am’ , through Moses that include The Passover, The Day of Atonement, The Feast of Tabernacles and the Feast of Trumpets. These ancient rituals were designed to explain history, expectations and prophesy, rich in meaning as the secrets of God were related to humans. On the Sabbath (Saturday) it was ordained that everyone was to rest. In the Holy Communion the Messiah asks to be remembered at the conclusion of his visitation.

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In the early days of the Church, God walked amongst the Hebrews in the desert in what began as a 40 day passage turned into a 40 year epic. Problems began when they built a Golden Calf as a sacred homage to Him. In Anger he left the camp and waited for their children to grow up, free from the baggage of the Egyptian occult. He told Moses that he would send someone ‘like him’ to lead them, at a future date.

The future scenarios played out over the generations When they were in a relationship with Him they were fed, safe and well but when they chased after foreign idols He threw them off His land and left them to their own devises.

where are their gods,
    the rock they took refuge in,
38 the gods who ate the fat of their sacrifices
    and drank the wine of their drink offerings?
Let them rise up to help you!
    Let them give you shelter! (song of Moses)

In Bethlehem a child was born , a King from the Heavenly realm, that Moses was told to expect. From the moment of his birth he was hunted down. Jesus had as much hope of sitting on the temple throne as he would have asking the Pope to stop warming his seat and hand it over. The Kings of the world had made slaves and prisoners of the masses and had no intention of freeing them. The message of Jesus was that ‘they’ had been officially warned and the next visit would not be so friendly.

The Messianic movement that is spreading through-out the internet is linking Jews and Gentiles through a mutual respect of the ancient festivals that were founded by Moses and Jesus (Yeshua) . Both are removing the pagan and occult practises that have seeped into their religions and building a complete faith that links the Old and New Testament. The bible is read as a historical text not a fable. Old books, such as Enoch, that were removed from the Bible are revisited. Space missions, a spinning globe and evolution are traded in for a Flat Domed Earth populated by humans that were deliberate creations. For them, the book of Revelation has begun, the seals are being broken and its very likely that they will not be trading with an implanted chip in their hand.

Jesus turned and said to them,

“do not weep for me; weep for yourselves and for your children. 29 For the time will come when you will say, ‘Blessed are the childless women, the wombs that never bore and the breasts that never nursed!’ 30 Then

“‘they will say to the mountains, “Fall on us!”
    and to the hills, “Cover us!”’[b]

31 For if people do these things when the tree is green, what will happen when it is dry?” 

During the Nazi realm religion was replaced with the occult. Germans as a greeting would say ‘God Bless’ , it was changed to “heil Hitler’,

That charming fat man who steals Jesus’s thunder and takes credit for Parents presents, has some dubious friends. Santa rewards the good kids with trinkets but the ‘elves’ are known in Europe as Krampers, they hit and kidnap bad kids.

not nice.

 

 

 

 

Painting of The Lords supper by Andy Warhol

Messanic sabbath services; 206 Bambra Rd, Caulfield South VIC 3162

Bombing the Environment causes Climate Change

Since 1945 there have been 2056 known nuclear test explosions around the Earth, including Australia. Most of the tests have taken place on Aboriginal peoples land and small islands in the pacific. Whist it appears that “Climate Change’ is a central topic of motivation for a range of strategic outcomes, no plan can be complete without assessing extreme damage of nuclear blasts. Responsible steps toward disarmament, regardless of being unlikely, is the only rational option.

Dropping bombs has caused devastating havoc on our people, our land, the oceans and fault lines. We can’t take back time but we can consider that the impact is greater than anyone is willing to predict.  Every bomb that hits the ocean kills marine life and pollutes our shores.

As early as ‘ March 1, 1954, the United States military tested nuclear bombs in the ocean around Bikini Atoll in the Pacific Ocean to see what kind of damage they would do to ships. The largest explosion was set off 90 feet underwater: nicknamed “Castle Bravo,” the bomb blasted a crater 2 kilometers (more than 1.2 miles) wide in the coral reef and obliterated ocean life in the area‘      Ocean.Si.edu

Ceduna, known as the Cancer Capital of Australia had nuclear dust blown in from the Emu Fields where 600 bombs were dropped in the 1950’s.

“It was in the morning, around seven. I was just playing with the other kids. That’s when the bomb went off. I remember the noise, it was a strange noise, not loud, not like anything I’d ever heard before. The earth shook at the same time; we could feel the whole place move. We didn’t see anything, though. Us kids had no idea what it was. I just kept playing. It wasn’t long after that a black smoke came through. A strange black smoke, it was shiny and oily. A few hours later we all got crook, every one of us. We were all vomiting; we had diarrhoea, skin rashes and sore eyes. I had really sore eyes. They were so sore I couldn’t open them for two or three weeks. Some of the older people, they died. They were too weak to survive all of the sickness. The closest clinic was 400 miles away.”       Sami Lester iCAN website

Soil contamination and biological effects creates a legacy of devastation for the generations that follow the original victims. Space has also been a nuclear bomb playground. Every time a missile is fired on our Earth, a criminal act has taken place.

 

 

Type into Google, the reasons for Global Warming and these are some of the answers offered.

‘Burning Fossil Fuel, De-Forrestation & Farming’ WWF

‘The Sun is to blame’ NASA

Humans’ Union of concerned Scientists

Theses are all very good reasons for localised de-genaration but avoid the most obvious impact.Operation Fishbowl

 

Melbourne in pictures

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Spring Concepts
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Visiting Exhibitions
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Social Concerns
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Fringe festivals
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Fashion
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Overcoming odds
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Theatre
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Visiting Ballet
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Comedy
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Standing Up
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Summer drinks
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Winter rain
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ANZAC DAY
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Local Ballet

imageFashion Historyimage

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Local Character
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Street Art
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Local Artist
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Romance
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Marriage
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Fun
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Friends
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Bayside
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Family
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Locals
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Landlords

The Fabric Architect

“I wanted to be an Architect” Dior

French designer Christian Dior craved an artistic life as the economic world collapsed under the weight of the war machine that had eaten into Europe. He fell into the company of artists, and sought the bohemian path in the aftermath of terror. They had new hope, a brighter path, where he could be an artist or an architect and became a Fashion Designer.

Dior learnt the sophistication of simplicity through his training with designer Robert Piguet from 1937, yet his spatial designs grew out of his visual comprehension of Architecture, creating elaborate folds and abundant material to create contrasts that would highlight a slim waistline through his A-line skirts that dropped just short of the floor to make the model appear taller.

“I drew flower ladies” Dior

This return to the former traditions and the excessive indulgence of fabric angered the post-war women that had achieved a degree of independence through taking on jobs during the war that required sensible attire. Material was still rationed and his designs also mocked the practice accessibility of the ‘new look’.

“The women were very closely tailored and it wasn’t easy, there was no freedom, morally women were veering toward a freer , more equal way of being, of course 68′ proved this many years later. Dior was fastening them into inconvenience with skirts like the BON BON dress that must have used 30 meters of fabric. It was tailored to the waist……tight fitting shoulders..breasts lifted with bra and corset, the dress even had an inner frame” Pierre Cardin

Dior’s vision was a cog that sent women back to the home, as the men returned from war and re-entered the workforce. Fashion that ornamented womens figures, new kitchens and pushing prams was the road into the 1950’s. Celebrities, Royalty and Movie stars modelled his frocks and set the scene in womens magazines for women to admire and sew.

Dior designed all of the dresses worn by Marlene Dietrich in Alfred Hitchcock’s classic ‘Stagefright’.

 “So long as I have the dress I am the one who decides how long this show will run, .. and everything else(quote from movie Stagefright)

Dior did not enjoy the celebrity life, he preferred life outside of the spotlight of his Haute Couture kingdom, however his business acumen rarely failed him. Despite his success, he didn’t have a Fashion House until he was 42 years of age.

‘Australian women were among the first outside of Paris to witness, model and purchase original Dior designs. Less than a week after Dior’s dramatic debut of February 1947, articles celebrating his talent appeared in local newspapers.’ NGV

Up until the late 70’s most women could sew clothes for their families and magazines promoted dress patterns over shop purchases. Fashion designers had to be a step ahead of their acute audience and the dazzle of Dior’s complex silhouettes continued to challenge women who tried to make what few could afford. David Jones (Sydney) presented a Dior fashion parade in 1948.

The elegant French designs were tempered into frocks that marked ‘the look’ of the 50’s. As fashion relaxed in the 70’s, puffed up in the 80’s and went grunge in the 90’s, the Dior sophistication excites a retrospective desire for elegance.

During the week the NGV was wall to wall with women visiting the gallery, marking the Spring Carnival of fashion in Melbourne.

 

 

 

 

Christian Dior The Man behind the myth, Phillipe Lanfranch

 

 

 

Art Auction at the Prince, St Kilda

 

In its 24th year, the AKC Auction is being held at the Prince, St Kilda on October 18. Local legend’s Tex Perkins and Charlie Owen, hot off the Tex, Don and Charlie’s sold out Australian tour, will perform on the night.

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Tex Perkins

The AKC Art Auction is the charities major fundraiser for the year with significant Australian artists including Todd Hunter, Luke Sciberras, Lewis Miller, David Bromley, Mark Schaller, Jenny Watson, Lisa Roet, Sally Smart, Roger Kemp and David Larwill, donating work for children in need. Bidders will be able to choose from over 60 pieces.

Larwill, who sadly passed away in 2011, founded the volunteer run charity in 1994. Since then AKC has raised and granted more than 1 million dollars to children experiencing hardship, Australia wide. In the last financial year, AKC helped more than 40 children, 10 group projects and funded $2,000 Scholarships for six students. The important work that Larwill began has continued under the direction of his widow Fiona Larwill.

FullSizeRender-183“A bellweather of a society is the manner in which it treats and assists children in need. ” Daniel Crennan, QC (Chairperson AKC).

The 2017 AKC Auction, set to raise over 1 hundred thousand dollars will provide opportunities for children experiencing hardship.

MONA, the road to OZ

MONA; the Museum of Old & New Art

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FRENCH BAKERY in Devonport ; We got egg n bacon roll em up baby , savory toast that’s the most , sausage and fries what kind of pie? a la mode if you will……..T.W. include tel 036427 1077 Drop in, before you head off.

Prior to the visit I had heard plenty of favourable comments and recommendations about MONA; surprisingly they were coming from a range of people varying from art lovers to people with typically little interest in the arts. This intrigued me on the lead up to the visit. After visiting the gallery I understand its broad appeal; it’s a place where enjoyment and the experience are placed as the ultimate priority over pretension. Before any art is viewed, visitors have already been captivated by fun from the roaming roosters, kids trampoline, boat ride (dependent on arrival method), Tasmania’s oldest vineyard and the spectacular and awe-inspiring architecture – it has already been a successful venture. From here on it’s all a bonus, but it continues to intrigue with atmospheric galleries that range from tight quirky spaces to vast open areas. The art itself is diverse in its appeal with a little something to tickle everyone’s interest.’ MONA Visitor

 

MONA is not what you would expect regardless of all you have heard. We took ‘the journey ‘ beginning on the historic Station Pier for a Bass Straight crossing on the Spirit of Tasmania. The large window portals in the cabins gave a haunting view of the black water peeling back into white foam as the ship cut into a calm night sea. We arrived on the chilly Devonport coast at 6am with a temperature of zero.

The road to the museum of OZ has a few enchantments on the early Spring morning that perpetuate the unfolding drama of the landscape. As a typical Melbourne crew we anticipated a home-grown cuisine and strong coffees at the next town, we were mistaken, as each village was merely half a dozen rooftops and no signs that pointed us to a cafe. We regretted not dropping into the All Nice Things Bakery that beckoned from the corner, with the signed promise of a warm breakfast, if we had have known that cafes were few and far between, we would have eaten and stocked up.

Rumbling stomaches and caffeine withdrawals aside ,the natural resplendent views that the winding roads were drawing us into, satisfied the Winter frayed mind. Each scene was vast and framed within majestic snow-capped peaks. Our first stop was within the heavily mossed rainforest of the Liffey Falls , a gushing river flowing into cascading waterfalls. This area was once heavily populated by the Pattittore Aboriginal people, they held their social gatherings there, on this day there was only our small group.

The second wonder on the journey was the ice stalactites along the roadside, rain that was petrified into a dripping beauty. A short journey onward and random clumps on snow begin appearing on the side of the road unfolding into an expansive  snow field amongst the lakes. Naturally a snow fight ensued.

When we arrived at OZ, or rather MONA we were expecting a Glass City, not an old Vineyard, chooks and a small building set amongst outer shed like structures. It’s appearance is provincial, as though it was being considerate of the natural beauty that encased it. The real drama was yet to come.

Mona is built into the ground, not above it. The evaluator takes us deep into her interiors and we arrive at the lower floor of a towering bedrock wall, flanked by a contemporary Bar at one end and a 50’s Tea Room at the other, passing by a waterfall of words.

 

The current exhibition is the The Museum of Everything  and although Mona is a highly contemporary venue , this exhibit invites you into wallpaper drawing-room with a random collection of worldly works and audio stories to match the vision.

 

Is Mona the interior of a rich persons fantastical world? – Yes  

Is it Art-worthy? – Yes

Is it magnificent? – Absolutely

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Sidney Nolan Room

 

Catch the ‘Spirit’ and sleep in the dark waters, it’s a genuine adventure, but eat before leaving Devonport, or you will be hungry.

DISPLAY BAKERY 009
ALL THINGS NICE A French Bakery located at 175 Tarleton Rd Devonport

Plundered & Broken

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The tale of Aboriginal plunder is a never-ending ballad that sings in the winds of this great country, a land that Elea (Albert) Namatjira painted so lovingly in watercolour. Namatjira’s world-renowned artistic status may have provided him with a thin shield against racism but it was easily shattered, even his greatness, wealth and innocence could not protect him from incarceration.

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Namatjira surrounded by family as he painted

The legend begins when Artist , Rex Battarbee took a painting trip into the Outback, after returning from the devastation of War in the 1930’s. He met Namatjira and it was through their collaboration that the 30-year-old Aranda man learnt to paint and exhibit. They went onto become lifetime friends, able to see pass the bigotry of the day.

International success took this humble man to great worldly heights, he was awarded the Coronation Medal and was the toast of the town. His exhibitions sold out shortly after they opened and most kitchens had one of his reproductions on a calendar or tea towel.

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Before the 1967 Referendum, Australian Aboriginals where denied Human Constitutional Rights and were categorised as part of the wildlife or wards of the state. They were denied most basic human rights and in an insipid twist of irony could not own their land as it had been acquired by the Commonwealth.

 

Namatjira’s unprecedented rise on the world stage would require him to have a passport and his growing wealth attracted taxes, thus him and his wife Robina were given Australian citizenship  in 1957, enabling him to buy a house in Morris Soak .

Unfortunately his children were not granted citizenship and were regarded as ‘Wards of the State’ as all Aboriginal people were. They did not have the right to choose their marriage partner, be legally responsible for their own children,to change location or socialise with non-aboriginals. It also meant that when the Great Artist and his wife died the Legal Will that aimed to financially protect their children was made void as his children belonged to the state. Their financial copyright royalties were ‘acquired’ by the state and sold on.

The Namatjira Project  began as an objective to buy back the royalties (which will expire shortly) but has become a legal investigation.

The most moving part of the film is when Namatjira’s  homeless grandson gives his artwork to the Queen in her palace and walks away empty-handed. The documentary is a thoughtful journey, full of beautiful archives and an artistic vision, they tip toe over a mine field but I think they have let off a bomb.

*Due to the humane efforts of The Namatjira Project, the Royalties have been returned.

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The Namatjira Family continue the water-colour tradition as their cultural inheritance.

 

 

 

THE NAMATJIRA PROJECT

DIRECTOR & CINEMATOGRAPHER Sera Davies

PRODUCER

Sophia Marinos

EXECUTIVE PRODUCER

Julia Overton

EXECUTIVE PRODUCERS (CULTURAL)
Lenie Namatjira
Gloria Pannka

Countdown Star

 

 

Renee Geyer

Australian jazz and soul legend, Renee Geyer has maintained a career that has spanned over 40 years. Her resonating voice has withstood the revolving door of the season and carved itself into a shaft of solid talent. She sprouted in the days of Countdown  under the wing of Mollie Meldrum, when Australian Music was finding itself in the awkward 70’s. Since then she has performed with Joe Cocker, Stevie Wonder and Caka Kahn.

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Renee Geyer interview by Molly Meldrum on Countdown

‘Heading in the Right Direction’ was the cornerstone of her International rise in R & B circles despite her Australian origin. Her powerful raspy sound demanded renown and in 2005 Geyer was inducted into the ARIA Hall Of Fame.

‘Renée Geyer had started out a sensual blues belter. Now she has evolved into a bona fide music icon’

  Norman Gunstan interview Geyer at end of act

The further one digs into the Artist’s rise, Melbourne’s musical roots are unearthed and reveal its early adolescence. The heavily populated music scene that is bursting through the internet daily has replaced the sleepy town that waited a week to watch 30 minutes of Countdown on the ABC, for the latest music news.

The unbridled talent of the local star walks hand-in hand with her controversial mentions in the news, from careless driving to public tantrums, she is a formidable Melbourne force.

Sat Aug 5;  8pm – MEMO Music Hall St Kilda  7.30pm, 

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HELPING LOCAL FAMILIES

donate@stkilda.org

 

 

What to Do?

As the last veil of sunshine and warmth left our streets at the end of June, a shadow fell like doom and cast us into our beds with flu’s. June was invigorating, July is dismal. Fortunately there is the The Tour De France to remind us of a Summer, somewhere.

Sorting through the closet each morning to find something warm to wear is challenging and reduces the rotating option to the point where black is best. There is nothing more unnerving than looking out of the window, before heading out, and seeing the trees twisted over by the wind. For bike riders, it tests endurance.

During Summer people proclaim winter is great as you can rug-up, mmmm, wind and hail are stronger. In the sunny season, they say, it’s cosy in front of a fire, mmmm, who has an open flame? They say it’s easier to get warm than get cool, mmmm, my bedroom is an ice machine.

What to do?

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The Clever ones are exploring Central Australia, cruising the Islands or flying North. For those that forgot to book the early-bird airfares there are a few local options.

Option 1. Head to the snow, you can buy bus day-passes at Southern Cross railway station, on your way home from work.

Option 2. Do Christmas in July, make it fun.

Option 3. Book a ticket on the ferry to Tasmania, be fearless.

Of Course, there is football.

On that happy note, be brave, drive carefully and buy orange juice.

 

 

April Forward

 

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Editing & Document writer

Ramsay Art Prize finalists

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SA BIKE TOURS

 

FullSizeRender-60Art is language and in many countries pictures are a part of dialogue. The inviting interiors of Cue, De Souza, Hughes and Selleck examine the priorities of pretext and invite interactive, participation. The exhibition moves away from traditional painting and allows a multi-media vioce.

Let’s meet the ART

GEORGINA CUE

The Living room, sets an exotic stage for a classical diva in what appears like an ancient setting. The bold artwork seems to have a Cubist influence with an early Century  twist. Both powerful and beautiful, the photographic work ,an inkjet on rag-paper, is a central work in the exhibition.

REBECCA SELLECK

Lapin Plague, 2016

This is an engaging installation, on many levels, firstly it invites you into it. It is a homely domestic scene with what appears to be, occupied by small rabbits. On closer examination the (heated) rabbit skins have no heads, therefore they are not alive. ‘Outside of the cage’, it would appear that the rabbits and humans are enjoying a shared space and when you touch the skins they are robust and warm, but they are not.

KEG DE SOUZA

We built this city

This impressive structure is made from salvaged tents and plaid laundry bags. Within the interior is a communal area with milk crates to sit on and books on the history of the Tent Embassy in Canberra. Coming off the main ‘room’ are an array of small tent rooms. It is the perfect Festival space, providing your guests have house manners, better than a Tipi because there are rooms, however a tad flammable.

The concept of tribe and tent and engaging in the environment as opposed to destroying it, is an old age concept, in Western Culture according to the old testament, the Christian/ Jewish God lived in a tent.

The added beauty whist in the tent is listening to the haunting sound of traditional Fado singers, from the outside film by Jacobus Capon that examines memories of a home gone. The Australian factor is that we came as refugees, yet our memories resonate. Are we adapting or are we all in a state of diaspora.

 JACOBUS CAPONE

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Forgiving night for day.

Multiple films projected  onto the Art Gallery wall are of lone characters watching the dawn above the rooftops of Lisbon, Portugal. Capone examines the state of nostalgia. It is an absorbing work, visually engaging as the sound-scape floods the skies above the sleeping town.

NATALYA HUGHES

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All of Your Women and Some of Mine, 2016

An interior space with a strong Mattise influence, using decorative abstract contrasts in colour and pattern, appearing like a digital construct..

TONY ALBERT

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Exotica (Mid Century Modern)

Albert’s political comment on the state of our country as an ashtray, is in dire contrast of the pristine land that was taken from its previous owners.

‘Albert has developed a universal language that seeks to rewrite historical mistruths and injustice.’

SARAH CONTOS

FullSizeRender-66The Long Kiss Goodbye

‘The winning work of art is titled Sarah Contos Presents: The Long Kiss Goodbye and brings together personal remnants of Contos’ practice from the last four years’. Contos was awarded $100,000 for this mixed medium collaged ‘quilt’.

 

April Forward

 

 

 

 

 

escapegoat.com.au

Includes kangaroos, koalas, bike hire, pick ups from Adelaide and a stack more.

 

 

A beautiful evening

MUSIC REVIEW

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Josh, one of our new music reviewer’s arrived to a full house at the Tote in Collingwood on the weekend, for the launch of  Ferla’s  new album Guilt Pop / Stay Posi.

‘It was packed, nearly overflowing, an Indie rock sound, a bit electronic; in the genre of Sticky Fingers. The crowd was  ‘very alive’ and tuned in; mostly hipsters. ‘

Giuliano Ferla. hit the high notes easily whist being supported by a band that infused his mood, the synthesiser player engaged the audience with a complex construct of layered chords,  one on a keyboard and synth on the other. Ocean Party, and dewy garage Girlatones. were the supporting bands and Loose Tooth DJs spun the tunes for the night.

Ferla engaged with the audience and explained the development of the lyrics with personal insights.

 “Imagine your life as if you wanted nothing at all.”

It was a great evening, showcasing a talent that has arrived after a many performances, a terrific line-up and an evening that engaged the respect of the audience.

“There was a great vibe.” Josh

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Audience Response:

“If its on spotify its definitely going in my collection.”

 

FERLA Wasted on you

FERLA GUILT POP/STAY POSI
DOUBLE EP

1. Breakups Are Hard For Everybody
2. I’m Nobody’s Baby Now
3. In The Night
4. You’re There
5. I Can’t Let You Down
6. Wasted On You
7. Children Are Our Future
8. Limited Time

Spotify | iTunes
Facebook| Instagram | Bandcamp

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2 Bob Weekend

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Ormond Rd Elwood Grocer

On a mild Winter weekend, Melbourne’s Music elite came together to honour the songs of Bob Dylan before a full house at the Memo in St Kilda. Friday night was dedicated to acoustic Bob and on Saturday night, it was electric Bob.

The ‘All-Star’ back up band,  consisting of  Benny Franz, Stephen Hadley, Ben Wiesner , and Shane O’Mara , melted seamlessly into each other, but it was guitar legend O’Mara that stole the night with his stella performance. It was a group of musicians fit for the honoured legend himself.

Who is Bob Dylan? Songwriter, Poet or Prophet; Jew or Christian? His lyrics resonated with the crowd that held resolute with dignified appreciation of the words and the artists. Loud talkers were quickly hushed.

Come gather ’round people
Wherever you roam
And admit that the waters
Around you have grown
And accept it that soon
You’ll be drenched to the bone.
If your time to you
Is worth savin’
Then you better start swimmin’
Or you’ll sink like a stone
For the times they are a-changin’.
Come writers and critics
Who prophesize with your pen
And keep your eyes wide
The chance won’t come again
And don’t speak too soon
For the wheel’s still in spin
And there’s no tellin’ who
That it’s namin’.
For the loser now
Will be later to win
For the times they are a-changin’.
Come senators, congressmen
Please heed the call
Don’t stand in the doorway
Don’t block up the hall
For he that gets hurt
Will be he who has stalled
There’s a battle outside
And it is ragin’.
It’ll soon shake your windows
And rattle your walls
For the times they are a-changin’.
Come mothers and fathers
Throughout the land
And don’t criticize
What you can’t understand
Your sons and your daughters
Are beyond your command
Your old road is
Rapidly agin’.
Please get out of the new one
If you can’t lend your hand
For the times they are a-changin’.
The line it is drawn
The curse it is cast
The slow one now
Will later be fast
As the present now
Will later be past
The order is
Rapidly fadin’.
And the first one now
Will later be last
For the times they are a-changin’.

Each vocalist made his songs their own and each captivated the audience. Liz Stringer was haunting, almost gothic as her lone figure shone in the darkness etching the words and reaching into the void. Song-bird Lisa Miller was mesmerizing and thrust the show forward,  her talent is palpable. Chris Wilson’s scratchy soul voice penetrated into the mind of the listener, like a dark cry and ‘Raised by Eagles’ duo Luke and Nick raised the tempo with a bit of  rockabilly. All of the vocalists on the night where exceptional.

A memorable evening.

Audience response.

“Shane O’Mara is a Melbourne music legend and of Liz Stringer, you need to get her last two albums.”

Review by April Forward

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Writer for Hire

Truth, what is truth?

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REVIEW

George Orwell’s 1984 , adapted by Robert Icke & Duncan Macmillan, is currently playing at the Comedy Theatre.

‘You don’t have to be an expert to know that Newspeak is the only language in the world whose vocabulary gets smaller every year.”

Unwriting people, removing words, controlling thoughts was Orwell’s dismal view of the future. The play explores the tragic demise of the human spirit with brutal clarity.

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Tom Conroy as Winston

Winston played by Tom Conroy, is man of fear that falls prey to the Party machinery by daring to hope. His Partner in crime, the fierce and splendid Julia (Ursula Mills) is a vision that bursts into his life to set it ablaze for a brief moment.

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O’Brien (Terrence Crawford) Winston (Tom Conroy) & Julia (Ursula Mills)

The wooden interiors and costumes seem reminiscent of the 50’s when the book was written, a generation looking through the keyhole of the condition of the world in 1984. There are no clumsy cream PC’s or the continuous screening of the Iran- Iraq war that dominated our tv’s, in the 80’s. In its essence, the rich nostalgic settings creates a longing for something personal and contrasts the horror of The Ministry of Love.

The acting,direction and effects are flawless. Fiona Press as Mrs Parsons is formidable, by merely stirring a caldron, she captivates a mood that seeps onto the stage.

The Lighting (Natasha Chivers), Sound (Tom Gibbons) and Video Designer (Tim Reid) are major players in the production and carry the full power and might of Big Brother. It’s a beautifully crafted masterpiece, the sets have amazing attention to detail and border on the sublime.

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Paul Blackwell , Terence Crawford & Tom Conroy

Audience response:

“Nothing is believable, everything is manipulated, it’s unfortunate for humanity”

Do you think the play has any relevance to you? MP

“Which agencies are believable and which aren’t , its awful and in the end all you have is your own soul and that’s ripped apart as well.”

So what did you think about the play?

“It’s done amazingly well , there is nothing held back”

Would you recommend it?

“Very much , I want the world to see it”.

Some audience members had to leave midway in the final act, it is confronting.

PHOTOGRAPHS BY SHANE REID

MELBOURNE
Comedy Theatre
until June 10

 

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The Man who United our Nation

The Lonely Hero

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Lionel Rose was unaware of the National Pride that he had evoked. When the plane landed back in Melbourne in 1968, thousands of well dressed white people cheered from the tarmac and balconies to welcome home the Aboriginal Star. A convertible was parked awaiting his arrival.

” Who are all these people waiting for ?” Rose asked the Air-hostess. He thought that maybe a The Beatles had arrived at Essendon Airport.

“You” she replied.

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Lionel Rose was a National Boxing Hero after he won the Bantamweight Title by beating Masahiko ‘Fighting’ Harada, the Japanese Champion in Tokyo.

People had sent gum leaves over to Japan in support of the young boxer.

Lionel Rose was propped up at the back of the convertible so that the roaring crowd could get a good look at him and shake his hand as he passed. A ticker-tape parade down Swanston Street had been arranged, and the street was lined with 100,000 Melbournians, cheering the Aboriginal man. He went on to become The Australian of the Year in 1968.

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Aboriginal people had been granted Australian Citizenship in 1967 which meant that Rose could obtain a passport, buy land and obtain legal rights. The constitutional Referendum, to allow Aboriginals rights, was voted in favour by 90.77 of the population, on the 27th of May. Rose won the Title on 26th of Feb, which meant that the 19-year-old had been an Australian Citizen for 9 months. Rose was a Celebrity for both Aboriginals and Caucasians, when the fight against racism was still on shaky turf.

Rose was the first Original Australian to be named Australian of the Year. When accepting the award, he said;

“One hundred and eighty-two years ago one of my mob would have been a dead cert for this.” (www.australianoftheyear.org.au)

RECONCILIATION WEEK May 27 – June 3

Orwell’s 1984 is back

‘Power is only what you allow it to be’.1984

English-born , George Orwell’s, 1984, will be re-visited.

MELBOURNE
Comedy Theatre
31 May – 10 June

Despite the age of the novel, its potent warning remains.

Orwell wrote the book in 1948, but it’s most relevant to those born in 1984 as the days of surveillance are upon us. ‘Big brother is watching’. Ironically Steve Jobs included a clip of the movie when Apple launched the Mac, in 1983. 1984 and the internet age coincide and determine the possibility of life imitating art.

Many of us read 1984 at school, a few of us saw the movie and though it’s been dormant for a decade or two, it resurfaces in a blaze.

Written as a Sci-fi, he wrote it based on events he witnessed as a Colonial Policeman in Burma. He never went to university and was not author previously, but what he wrote continues to resonate through time.

‘Why was he writing it? For the future, for the unborn’ (1984)

In ‘1984’, war is prolific, slavery, torture and imprisonment without trial, are common and fear abounds. The population is constantly aware that they are being watched and denied privacy.

He explains that ‘double speak’ is talk that reframes negative terms as positive and this language is used to subvert and confuse the masses.

War is Peace

Freedom is Slavery

Ignorance is Strength

Orwell knew the exploitation of power as he saw it first hand, as an inflicter, not a victim. He had used a female slave as a house companion, enforced cruelty and led men to their deaths. 1984 was to purge the pain of his conscience and to warn the innocent.

‘The hate had started.’ Orwell

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1984

“To hold the population down by force, I was in the police, which is to say. I was part of the machinery” Orwell

Although Orwell engaged in an evil authority he could not digest it, it disturbed him and led him to undermine his future life in acts of penance. 1984 was written to warn the innocent and to have hope that a future he saw could be prevented.

“ I watched a man hang once …… I didn’t realise what it meant to destroy a healthy conscious man…cutting a life short when it is in full tide, this man was not dying, he was alive, just as we were alive. He and we were a party of men, seeing, hearing and feeling, understanding the same world and in two minutes one of us would be gone” Orwell

Today young children play killing games, in their rooms on their computers. Some of the video games are rich in realism which makes the malice more personal; some are playing on Defence websites that observe their results for recruiting purposes. Many parents adopt the slogan, ‘Ignorance is Strength.’

‘So vicious was the boys demeanor it was hardly a game, it was frightening like tiger-cubs that will grow into man eaters … Mrs Parsons eyes flitted nervously from Winston to the children and back again….they do get noisy, she said. They’re disappointed because they couldn’t get to see the hanging, I’m too busy to take them.’ 1984

Orwell like Vincent Van Gogh walked away from his middle class life to become ‘down and out in Paris and London’, as a hobo he hoped to rid himself of the imperialist past that haunted him.

According to Orwell, war is ‘double think’, it is to use the product of the machine without producing goods. It is designed to strip human resources so those that have absolute power, can enjoy power.

If people live hungry and are overworked, even when it is easy for all to live well, it serves cruelty. Orwell explains in 1984 that there is a surplus of resources and all are able to live well but this is contrary to the desires of the ruling class.

‘The slave population allow the continuous tempo of war to be sped up …the primary aim of warfare is to use up the products of the machine without raising the general standard of living, the problem of what to do with the surplus’ 1984

Orwell explains that poverty is deliberate.

 

The Other Art Fair

Get on your bike and head off to the other art fair.

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Before entering the building, graffiti artists have already marked the journey.

 

 

It’s a fabulous space, housing a catacomb of galleries and a cafe

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JC

Upon immediate entry we are reassured that the art is going to be world class with the work of JC.

 

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Jo White

The nostalgic work of Jo White is a delight.

 

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Cynthia Ellis

and Cynthia Ellis lays it on thick.

 

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Leah Emery at work

Leah Emery applies the cross-stitch of random pornographic spam as the new temptation

 

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Time Jones, Kittens 

and Tim Jones brings it home.

 

Christina Popovici explains Action Art

This is just a slim slice of The Other Art Fair at Kensington. I could have stayed all day. Go and be stimulated. Adorn with Australian Art.

The Other Art Fair presented by Saatchi Art   May 4-7

 

What pain women endure for shoes

I am taking a liberal guess, but I can confidently say that nearly all women have a pair of shoes that they endure with pain and will not throw out.

I went to the streets to test my theory. These are their stories.

Jess from Belgrave

Designer

“I have sitting shoes, I can’t walk anywhere without holding on to my partner’s hand. He props me up until I find a seat, then I can sit down, looking pretty.”

Other women call their un-walkable footware, their dinner shoes

Jan from Burwood

Hairdresser

Jan has 50 pairs of shoes and 12 Boots, which she rotates.

I asked her if she wore uncomfortable shoes.

“Absolutely that’s why I have sore feet. I just grin and bear it, anything for the look. I want to be tall and slim with long legs and when I get home I whinge”

Lizzi Ablmett from St Kilda

Sales Assistant

“I have 8 or 9 shoes that all hurt and I squeeze my feet into them, every night. I come home with blisters and bunyips. I do it because they look great. Even if they’re the wrong size I don’t care. The problem is my feet, not the shoes.”

Simone from Burwood

Sales Manager and Clothes Stylist

Simone has 41 pairs of shoes.

“I rotate my shoes, if I don’t wear them, I give them away. Since having a baby I no longer wear painful shoes, I need to run around and be able to pick up Alice.”

Bernie from Hallam

Sales Manager and Fashion Coordinator

Bernie leaves shoes at work that she changes periodically, during the day, to regulate the pain.

“I’ll wear painful shoes if they go with the outfit”

Sonia from Watirna

IT Specialist

Sonia has knee issues and is forced to wear sensible shoes however she holds onto her ‘unwearables’.

“I look too gorgeous in them, to throw them out.”

Sophie from Elwood

“I am drawn to the statement and collect them like feet ornaments, yet I wear the comfy one’s everyday. My collection waits for me.

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Gemma from Mont Albert

Journalist; L’Oreal

“ I was a ballet dancer for 18years, I’ve put my feet through so much pain, I can handle any shoe now.”

Dorota from Mt Waverley

Legal Intern

“I have an obsession, all of my friends come to borrow my shoes. People tell me I’m crazy. My uncle, who is a builder made me shelves, for half of my wall, for all my shoes.

Tell me about your favourite.

“ I bought a pair in Poland. If I wear them out at night, I can’t walk the next day.”

Vinita from St Kilda

Journalist

“I can’t wear heels or my foot will twist, I can’t balance but I always want them”

Do you buy them?

“Yes, a lot, I’ve got 13 pairs, but I only wear two.”

What does you partner say about your shoes?

“When I go shopping, my husband will say. ‘Why do you want them, you wont wear them? He thinks I’m just collecting the things”.

Kshipra from Hoppers Crossing

Manager

“I have really high heeled white shoes with pretty straps and I just wore them once. I didn’t take public transport, I got my husband to drive me to the door of the restaurant. When we wanted to walk around the city, I changed into other footwear.”

And do you still have them?

“Yes, its been three years since I bought them but I wont throw them out. I always dust them and put them back, I hope to wear them some day. The hope is there.”

What does your partner say about your shoes?

“ He says, why don’t you give off the ones you don’t’ wear, then buy the new ones? I say, no I’ll wear them some day.”

Kshipra adds;

“At Crown, after the party, I walked out and see these women,  the first thing they do is take off their shoes. And there was one girl, no matter what, she did not want to remove her heals. She was holding to her friend, because she couldn’t stand on her own, yet she refused to remove her shoes.

We were watching her from behind and we really thought she would fall.

Based on these stories, I conclude that Cinderella didn’t loose her shoe, she was kicking them off at the end of the Ball.

On the Clock

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As the MICF circus wraps up, 2 clowns sent it off with a bang.

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The afternoon show at ACMI was the icing on the Festival, after a series of ‘Stand up’ wit and profound observations we discover a new territory. These Guys have nothing to say, it’s what they do that suspends reality and slaps you in the face. Throughout  the performance the unexpected continued to surface from beneath the banal.

Confused? Good , that’s a great start.

You will be bewitched within a Dadaists performance of an office mundane that imploded into the wild and creative instinct of lifes little dramas. Bit by bit they shatter through reality to reveal a seething internal existence with comic twists.

Intrigued? I hope so, it is an intriguing experience.

No matter how sober you think you are, they will pick up your solid piece of reality and twist it until you feel entirely happy. Like an animal can become a chair, a thing can become an animal. They are very clever Consultation Specialists.

Welcome to Ruck’s Leather Interiors starring Gareth Grubb (Trygve Wakenshaw) and Dennis Chang (Bernie Duncan) as Performance Artists.

Bernie Duncan

FullSizeRender-20 Where did you Guys train? MP

“I didn’t do training but Ttygve went to Gaulier, a French Clown School in Paris.”

How did you get into this? MP

“I always made theatre, we started a Company (Theatre Beating) about 14 years ago, and we made stuff we liked”

Audience Responce

“I never dreamed that I would ever see two people entertain me from the time they started right up until the very end. Everything that happened was totally unexpected , it shocked me, it was so funny and you never knew what was coming and everything that came was brilliant.”

The Top Ten

EASTER

For some it’s an annual 4 day Autumn weekend, mass exodus to the coast.

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For others, it is the EXODUS

It’s that Holy time of the year for Jews and Christians, Passover and  Resurrection rituals reminding the faithful of a power stronger than death. Revolutionary leaders such as Martin Luther King and Gandhi have drawn from these ancient beliefs to alter the fate of the future. The original set of Commandments were the moral compass for the refugees that were escaping slavery and dreaming of a better place.

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Moslems a branch of Abraham, Commandments: 1/47:19  2/14:35  3/2:24  4/62:9  5/17:23 6/5:32  7/17:32 8/5:38  9/2:283  10 20:131

Although Jews, Moslems and Christians are keen to point out their differences, the ‘top ten’ applies to them all.

1. CREATOR
“I am the Lord your God, who brought you out of the land of Egypt, from the house of slavery.”

2. NO IDOLS
“You shall not recognise other gods before Me. You shall not make for yourself a carved image, or any likeness of what is in heaven above or on the earth beneath or in the water under the earth.”

3. RESPECT
“You shall not take the name of the Lord your God in vain, for the Lord will not leave him unpunished who takes His name in vain.”

4. SATURDAY
“Remember the Sabbath day, to keep it holy. Six days you shall labor and do all your work, but the seventh day is a Sabbath to the Lord your God; you shall not do any work, you or your son or your daughter, your male or your female servant, your animal or your stranger within your gates.”

5. PARENTS
“Honor your father and your mother, so that your days may be prolonged in the land which the Lord your God gives you.”

6. KILLING
“You shall not murder.”

7. CHEATING
“You shall not commit adultery.”

8 THEFT
“You shall not steal.”

9. SLANDER
“You shall not bear false witness against your neighbor.”

10. ENVY 
“You shall not covet your neighbor’s house; you shall not covet your neighbor’s wife or his male servant or his female servant or his ox or his donkey or anything that belongs to your neighbor.”

“We must learn to live together as brothers or perish together as fools” Matin Luther King

For Christians there was an add on.

A new commandment I give to you, that you love one another: just as I have loved you, you also are to love one another.  By this all people will know that you are my disciples, if you have love for one another.”

“The true measure of any society is how it treats it’s most vulnerable members” Gandhi

http://www.antislavery.org.au

EARTH IS A PRISON