Tag Archives: violence

SEXISM IS A CRIME.

Domestic Violence in our homes.

I will stand at my Watchpost, I will station myself on the Rampart.

Violence against women occurs across cultures and communities. It takes many forms, including physical, sexual, social, emotional, cultural, spiritual and financial abuse, and a wide range of controlling, coercive and intimidating behaviour. Regardless of the form it takes, it is understood to be most often used by men and its impact is to limit and control women’s independence.‘      White Ribbon

How did the need for women to enjoy the right of personal freedom and safety get so tangled up with a minority of women drawn into sexual exhibitionism. The word is INDUSTRY it’s essence is Corporate. Sex sells, so regardless of how many women and girls are beaten and raped, the magazines ramp up; serial rapists/murderers are the main themes of TV crime stories and pornography is the Porn Industry. The Slave trade is a thriving ‘industry’. To abuse women is profitable, to deprive them of property reduces their social standing and their ability to ward off poverty.

Few people are aware that Corporations have deemed themselves Persons, therefore enabling themselves the protections that were designed for the vulnerable. Sexism is a incorporated crime, fuelled by the media and ignored in the community.

A true story of an Australian Woman.

I left my husband due to Domestic violence, not the type that hit but rather a tyrannical power that undermined the safety of my son and myself. I left him with the property as I wanted a clean break.

With a small loan I built a modest house. No sooner had the garden been planted, a neighbourhood gang of men accumulated outside my fence in the dead of night and ripped my front fence down. From my bedroom window I watched the violent force they used.

Every night they came. Sometimes to steal and sometimes to destroy.

They did the rounds, targeting Single women of the neighbourhood. A woman knocked on my door after the police car pulled away one night and asked. "Is it happening to you also?"
A girls refuge in the area had burnt crucifixes on the front lawn.

I eventually gave up and rented in town, by this time, I had lost my house,suffered PTSD, fear of the outdoors, insomnia that lasted 4 years and migraines, but still had the task to raise my son. There was no time to recover, I had to work.

‘White Ribbon Australia understands that the range of types of violence and their impacts on women and girls occur on a continuum, so that behaviours such as sexist jokes are seen as resulting from the same culture that enables physical and sexual assault, and murder of women and girls.’

Recently I overheard a conversation of some couples enjoying the outdoors and a few drinks with their meal. A conversation between a couple went like this..

HER: " Don't get drunk"

HIM: "Shut up C_ _ T"

FRIENDS: 'Laughter'

And what about teenagers and girls, who are growing up in a climate of corporate paedophilia and hyper-sexualisation? What is feminism going to do about this sordid mess.’  Due/Simic

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An Add for shoes

Violence against women is not hidden, its in plain site. A brothel in St Kilda boasts of having ‘Women on tap’ on an ugly sign, displayed on one of the busiest roads in Melbourne. We need to consider the boundaries that we are tearing down in the name of progress.

Quotes from White Ribbon website
& The Great Feminist Denial. Monica Dux/Zora Simic Melb Uni Press 2008

War,War; rumour of a war

BEN QUILTY

Australian Artist, Ben Quilty explores the depth of death, particularly murder, and the brutal assault of hastening it’s arrival. He is on tour through the desolate heartland of emptiness, an intrepid explorer, however climbing Everest is not his goal, his road leads into the deepest darkest terrains of the human experience.

“I am interested in humans”

Quilty was engaged as a War Artist for Afghanistan. The experience brought him face to face with Australians that are endlessly jeopardising their own mortality and live within a violence that has been raging for 18 years. Many have lost their lives and limbs, whist Post Traumatic Stress Disorder has gorged trenches, within the soldiers minds.

The Gallery visitor that has just had a glass of wine over lunch is taken into a war torn Earth, of shores littered with abandoned life-jackets from a fleeing population, naked soldiers shivering with PTSD and picnic spots that robbed Aboriginals of their life, dignity and history.

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The crisis of war washes up on the Grecian shores, as refugees flee their homeland to find safety abroad. The refugees have left all of their belongings and donned  lifejackets to cross, freezing sea’s in the black of the night. The reality of the Syrian crisis has not infiltrated the ‘connected world’ and the lack of response, drew the artist in. He intends to make the public aware of the trauma these young children are experiencing, by publishing a book of artwork by young Syrian victims.

                                     “My work is about how to live in this world”

In his homeland, Quigley explores landscapes of the Australian Genocide against its Aboriginal population. In his Rorschach landscapes of Fairy Bower and Amata, the artist documents a howling dark presence in place of a tribal home where children would have ran happily through the trees and bathed in the waterfall and its streams.

Quilty explores humans wrecking havoc on other humans, because they can, or are obliged to, within the social framework of the current systems. Environment’s may appear inviting and innocent but Quigley examines that which is lurking beneath. There is an anger in Quiltys work, he is hurting and you must too.

Quilty is a proficient landscape and figurative artist that can morph into a nightmarish surrealism. Quilty is battling a demon much larger and more connected than he. He wants justice, the paintings are the evidence and the gallery space is the court room. Quilty has managed to captured the attention of the art public with his profound statements in thickly plastered paint.

Like Van Gogh, he uses sculptural paint and his tortured metamorphosis are in keeping with Brett Whitely and Francis Bacon.

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Quilty’s has witnessed war and it has taken its toll on him, as an artist and a human he has walked amongst the disenfranchised and documents their experience. Where journalists have dropped off , the social issues, like leaves, Quilty has become Australias fourth estate, placing the news, no longer in the paper, but on the walls. Quilty challenges us to look into our own backyard.

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by April Forward