Category Archives: Melbourne Fashion

What pain women endure for shoes

I am taking a liberal guess, but I can confidently say that nearly all women have a pair of shoes that they endure with pain and will not throw out.

I went to the streets to test my theory. These are their stories.

Jess from Belgrave

Designer

“I have sitting shoes, I can’t walk anywhere without holding on to my partner’s hand. He props me up until I find a seat, then I can sit down, looking pretty.”

Other women call their un-walkable footware, their dinner shoes

Jan from Burwood

Hairdresser

Jan has 50 pairs of shoes and 12 Boots, which she rotates.

I asked her if she wore uncomfortable shoes.

“Absolutely that’s why I have sore feet. I just grin and bear it, anything for the look. I want to be tall and slim with long legs and when I get home I whinge”

Lizzi Ablmett from St Kilda

Sales Assistant

“I have 8 or 9 shoes that all hurt and I squeeze my feet into them, every night. I come home with blisters and bunyips. I do it because they look great. Even if they’re the wrong size I don’t care. The problem is my feet, not the shoes.”

Simone from Burwood

Sales Manager and Clothes Stylist

Simone has 41 pairs of shoes.

“I rotate my shoes, if I don’t wear them, I give them away. Since having a baby I no longer wear painful shoes, I need to run around and be able to pick up Alice.”

Bernie from Hallam

Sales Manager and Fashion Coordinator

Bernie leaves shoes at work that she changes periodically, during the day, to regulate the pain.

“I’ll wear painful shoes if they go with the outfit”

Sonia from Watirna

IT Specialist

Sonia has knee issues and is forced to wear sensible shoes however she holds onto her ‘unwearables’.

“I look too gorgeous in them, to throw them out.”

Sophie from Elwood

“I am drawn to the statement and collect them like feet ornaments, yet I wear the comfy one’s everyday. My collection waits for me.

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Gemma from Mont Albert

Journalist; L’Oreal

“ I was a ballet dancer for 18years, I’ve put my feet through so much pain, I can handle any shoe now.”

Dorota from Mt Waverley

Legal Intern

“I have an obsession, all of my friends come to borrow my shoes. People tell me I’m crazy. My uncle, who is a builder made me shelves, for half of my wall, for all my shoes.

Tell me about your favourite.

“ I bought a pair in Poland. If I wear them out at night, I can’t walk the next day.”

Vinita from St Kilda

Journalist

“I can’t wear heels or my foot will twist, I can’t balance but I always want them”

Do you buy them?

“Yes, a lot, I’ve got 13 pairs, but I only wear two.”

What does you partner say about your shoes?

“When I go shopping, my husband will say. ‘Why do you want them, you wont wear them? He thinks I’m just collecting the things”.

Kshipra from Hoppers Crossing

Manager

“I have really high heeled white shoes with pretty straps and I just wore them once. I didn’t take public transport, I got my husband to drive me to the door of the restaurant. When we wanted to walk around the city, I changed into other footwear.”

And do you still have them?

“Yes, its been three years since I bought them but I wont throw them out. I always dust them and put them back, I hope to wear them some day. The hope is there.”

What does your partner say about your shoes?

“ He says, why don’t you give off the ones you don’t’ wear, then buy the new ones? I say, no I’ll wear them some day.”

Kshipra adds;

“At Crown, after the party, I walked out and see these women,  the first thing they do is take off their shoes. And there was one girl, no matter what, she did not want to remove her heals. She was holding to her friend, because she couldn’t stand on her own, yet she refused to remove her shoes.

We were watching her from behind and we really thought she would fall.

Based on these stories, I conclude that Cinderella didn’t loose her shoe, she was kicking them off at the end of the Ball.

Dressmaker at Ripponlea

The Dressmaker exhibition at Ripponlea Estate is a great excuse to experience the opulent lifestyle of the very rich, in a past era.

The house, as grand as it is, is rather gloomy. It took party girl Louisa Nathan, daughter and heiress of the Mapels fortune, to bring it into the swing of the early new Century. A fit setting for ‘Tilly’s inspirations.

The pool , the tennis court and the new Deco Ballroom with a reinforced floor, built to withstand Charleston vigour was and remains, a perfect party venue.

The house was designed by Architect Joseph Reed, he also designed the State Library and the Royal Exhibition buildings. The sprawling pleasure gardens that incorporate a lake and secret paths, was the brainchild of the original owner, Frederick Sargood. With the help of 40 men, they created a personal vision of paradise that is now a peaceful public retreat, in the midst of suburbia and chaotic traffic.

The lush setting of the estate is in stark contrast to the butchered landscape of Dungatar yet essentially, both reject the wild beauty of the original bush.

The Cinderella effect that the character Tilly waves over the unworthy, beautifies the wretched, with imported fabrics and designs. In the early part of the last Century, Australians looked to Europe for the lead in Fashion, Architecture and Art.The early settlers had not found their own voice or local patronage.

“She transforms all the women from drab to Fab” Rebecca Gibney.

 

“In particular, for this film the costume is everything, most incredible dresses in my career, we start off with a palette of brown, grey and dull…’she’ (Tilly played by Kate Winslet) brings in the wealth of colour” Marion Boyce

The exhibition features designs by Marion Boyce and Margot Wilson. Wilson was the main designer for Winslet and Boyce moulds the town folk.

 

Exhibition until July 31

 

A.Forward

History in Fabric

200 years of Fashion at NGV Australia is a fashion warp of cultural remembering. It is commonly acknowledged that written history is told through the eyes of the ‘white man’, Aboriginal history through Art and Womens history through fashion.

The Suitors

This bride isn't shrinking away from a bold statement, there will be 2 suits in this marriage.
This bride isn’t shrinking away from a bold statement, there will be 2 suits in this marriage.

‘…the Colonial taste (which might differ from Melbourne suburb to suburb) was capricious, so different as to be sometimes absurd.’  Margaret Maynard

Revolution

‘Australian fashion from the early twentieth-century broadly emulated international trends and ideas of glamour inherited from Paris and Hollywood, but by the 1960’s, Australian designers were beginning to have there own impact on the world stage with work that no longer followed..’   Nadia Buick

Its political; burn the bra,womens lib,sexual liberation due to the pill & frighten your parents all at once.
Its political; burn the bra,womens lib,sexual liberation due to the pill & frighten your parents all at once.

 

 

Prue Actons ‘Youthquake’ reveals a sheer jumpsuit that sold for $60. David Jones marketed it to mainstream as sexy but for the Flower Power generation; ‘it was a symbol of passive resistance .. anti- war  protests..its changed attitudes and allegiances’   NGV

Meet Mr. John

All this suit needs is a perm,thick moustache, reflecting glasses. Its more trip than hip.
All this suit needs is a perm,thick moustache, reflecting glasses. Its more trip than hip.

House of Merivale and Mr. John Sydney, introduce the corduroy belted suit for men in 1973.

‘The 1970’s trend towards unisex attire, which saw traditionally ascribed masculine and feminine codes of dress become more androgynous.’    NGV

As the 70’s seep into the 80’s, The Chai Jumpsuit 1978, reveals fashionscapacity as a medium for artistic expression’   Danielle Whitfield.

Doing time with the Pistols
Doing time with the Pistols

the PUNK period, was no longer passive resistance, it was anarchy. The Melbourne music culture embraced punk, Sex Pistol films were played at Uni. events and the alternative scene was self supporting.

‘As the band reappeared for an encore, Sid showed the audience an obscene gesture and Steve yelled, “You must be mad to want more of us’             Dangerous Minds, Gallagher.

Less is Best for NOW

Inspired by Mondrain and conceptual minimalism and Kraftwerk.
Inspired by Mondrain , conceptual minimalism and Kraftwerk.

Tina Salivas studied fashion at Adelaide’s Marston College her 2007 creation draws inspiration from European Artists.

‘the cloth contributes to the overall design of the garment..to fully realise their artistic visions …they must not only develop form, but the textile as well.’    Paola Di Trocchio

 

 

 

extracts from 200 years of Fashion NGV publication.

Top Photo: Kate Durham ‘Sentimenta romantica de l’amour et glamour: Wedding ensemble 1982’ If this was the veil, imagine the reception.

review and photographs by A Forward

The Dressmaker

Have you seen the Dressmaker?

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“Yes, it reminded me of Daylesford when we were kids, it gave me the shivers.”

Have you seen the Dressmaker?

“Yes, isn’t Liam Hemsworth gorgeous?”

Have you seen the dressmaker?

“Yes, wasn’t the interaction between Judy Davis and Kate Winset amazing, they must have had heaps of fun.”

Have you seen Dressmaker?

“No, but country towns always have their secrets.”

Have you seen the dressmaker?

“Yes, I Loved it.”

Kate Winset sets fire to the screen, in a cathartic survival movie. The very chic Tilly (Winset) returns to her childhood home in the dead of night, to clean up and overcome her troubled past. Armed with a sewing machine she manifests as the fairy godmother with a cutting edge. The film explores ‘the heart of darkness’ in rural Australia, within a playful drama about frocks.

It’s definitely a film to be enjoyed on the big screen.

Kate Winset
Kate Winset

Costume designer Margot Wilson, runs up a series of ‘show stoppers’ for Winslet to flaunt. Marion Boyce is the ‘muse’ of Tilly’s designs.

“In particular, for this film the costume is everything, most incredible dresses in my career, we start off with a palette of brown, grey and dull…’she’ (Tilly played by Kate Winslet) brings in the wealth of colour”  Boyce

Judy Davies wrings out every essence of her character in her performance, as a tormented shrew.She is brilliant.

 

Banoffee; Melbourne’s ‘IT’ Girl


Singer, songwriter Martha Brown alias Banoffee, has a lot going on. Last years debut self-titled EP made it certain that 2014 was back to back, with national and international tours, including Byron Bay’s Splendour in the Grass, New York’s CMJ and Melbourne’s Sugar Mountain Festival. Currently, she is taking a break in Paris before she returns home for her October tour and the launch of a fashion line.

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It’s an exciting  and busy time for our local talent. Melbourne Press spoke to her, she was effervescent and warm, with an intelligent direction.

“ I wanted to make music that satisfied me.” B

She has incorporated R & B, Electronic and Country Music into her work.

“I love the story telling of country music , I wanted to combine a couple of genres together to express myself and that is how Banoffee came about.”B

Ninja was the first song that she released which explores the turbulence of the love hate relationship we have with ourselves and with others.

Ninja
Ninja

“I don’t want to do this pop thing where I pretend that I’m happy and do all these things that I’m not. So I write about something that is personal. Ninja is quite metaphoric.Some of it is about a relationship; but its mostly about, our relationships, as humans, with ourselves. How we beat ourselves up and can be our own worst enemy. It’s to help and try to overcome the dark feelings and dark times and turn that inner critic around….Lets stand up for ourselves” B

Her current releases explore and experiment with vocal techniques.

“I like to play around with freezing and make more dynamic sounds with vocals, I have a lot of fun using the pedals on stage and in recording.”B

‘Banoffee’s interests in creativity and the arts has made her an increasingly sought after style figure’

Banoffee is releasing a 10 piece clothing range in November under Melbourne Fashion lable, Pageant (Winners of 2015 Tiffany & Co Award). It’s a summer range inspired by all the tracks on the CD.

“I like to have fun with my style, going out is fancy dress for me. The main thing with fashion, for me, is to have fun and be comfortable.”B

Many of her film clips and photo shoots feature her neighbourhood in Clifton Hill. She is nurtured by her personal surroundings and influential sister, Hazel. The internet has favoured her.

“It a medium (internet) you have no control over, It’s the luck of the draw. When I first released Ninja, I was with a small record label but they worked very hard for their artists.They did a really good job at spreading my music through places like Soundcloud.”B

This is her time to shine but she’s no ‘flash in the pan’, pop princess. Banoffee has a tenacity and is a genuine artist

Bollywood Film & Fashion at Melbourne NGV

Bollywood Star, Actor and Producer, Anil Kapoor (Slumdog Millionaire), charmed a full audience in the Great Hall of the National Gallery of Victoria, at the Indian Film Festival of Melbourne Awards.

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International designers, famous Indian Actors and Directors with Local Politicians, crowded the stage in a first class presentation of fashion and film, on Indian Independence Day.

It was a night jammed with creative blitz, opening with swirling Bollywood dancing and followed by The Equality Fashion Show, which featured five diverse Fashion Designers and their latest creations. Films and Awards were presented between designers in a tight and full schedule.IMG_4201

Indian Arts are charging into the 21 Century with a voice, ripe and ready to nerve the old guard. Winner of the Western Union Short Film Award went to India Backchod for their production of Rape – It’s your fault.

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Equality and Diversity is the war cry of the Indian Film Festival, featuring stories that address issues of disability, homosexuality, racism and sexism, with a contemporary edge.

Winners on the IFFM awards for 2015 for best film was given to “Piku”, Best Director Award went to Shoojit Sircar and Best Actor award was given to Irrfan Khan for his performance in “Piku” The film is a quirky comedy about the relationship between an ageing father and his young daughter, living in a cosmopolitan city, dealing with each other’s conflicting ideologies while being fully aware that they are each other’s only emotional support

Best Actress went to Bhumi Pednekar in Dum Lagake Haisha and Best Indie Film went to Kaaka Muttai for Crows Eggs. IFFM Excellence in Cinema was awarded to Anil Kapoor and the Telstra People’s Choice Award was for PK.

The film awards show case the depth of talent in Indian Cinema when last years 2014 Film Awards went  Bhaag Milkha Bhaag, a true story based on the life of an Indian athlete Milkha Singh, who ran for India in the Rome,1960 Olympics.

Richard Nylon
Richard Nylon

The Fashion show featured the bizarre creations of Richard Nylon’s singular vision of Holy ruptures. Nylon specialises in couture millinery and bridal headpieces, they are literally sculptures in fabric. Winged beauties weighed with attitude, carried off the fantastic objects with ease.

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North Melbourne football player Majek Daw, wowed the ladies as he emerged out of the violet shadows with his sultry looks and bare chest wearing a Roopa Pemmaraju designed wrap, flung around his neck.

Pemmaraju showcased Aboriginal Art in her fabrics and the female models were crowned with indeginous flowers. The Australian context in the music and clothes ignited a sense of pride in a culture that continuously overlooks the remarkable sophistication of its own. The models breezed down the runway in flowing fresh designs, perfect for a hot and languishing summer.

Gaurav Gupta
Gaurav Gupta

Then came Gaurav Gupta, Indias renowed couturier. He tantalised the male audience with sheer and daring gowns that revealed more, by covering less. Stocking creations with beaded slashes playfully carved a thin line between that which is private and what can be seen in public. His work is dramatically elegant.

Anamika Khanna
Anamika Khanna

Designer for the Bollywood A-listers, Anamika Khanna brings a slice of traditional India to the catwalk. Hers is an edgy interpetation of Eastern fashion meets the West, whist remaining faithful to her regal audience.

MATERIALBYPRODUCT from NGV Collection
MATERIALBYPRODUCT from NGV Collection

Mildura born, fashion designer Susan Dimasi knows local taste, the female audience fully engaged with her very wearable collection of light chic frocks. Dimasi is a designer with an environmental conscience. Partnered with Chantal Kirby in the fashion house MATERIALBYPRODUCT their work is regarded as Art and are held in the NGV collections.

IMG_4138The sari sward crowd was an Indian cocktail of movie star fans, beauty queens, dignitaries and fashion lovers. Melbourne Press spoke to Jaz Shavvir who helped organise Miss World in New Zealand.IMG_4155

“Its good to see the Indian community doing so well” Shavvir remarked.

The event was also a fund raiser for The Royal Childrens Hospital garments were sold to raise money at the end of a long and enjoyable evening.

Less Fluff more Fun

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Milliners, Kim Fletcher and Kerrie Stanley claim that occasional dressing is part of the fun of going to events like the Melbourne Cup. This is their accessory forecast for racegoers this season. They want to see less fluff on the ends of combs; they want more substance and structure.

“We’ve grown up,” claims Ms. Fletcher

There are more materials available for them to develop their craft and to be more experimental. They are looking for non-traditional millinery items. They would like to see Melbournian women distinguish themselves by being more adventurous in head fashion. Their aim is for our Cup to be a unique fashion statement.

“Using stuff ‘outside the square’ and making them more modern.” Ms. Fletcher adds.

The women agree that Melbourne has some of the best milliners in the world and claims that the industry has stood the test of time due to the Melbourne Cup.

“We have a more casual lifestyle that’s why dressing up for the racers is such a big deal, even some weddings are quite casual in reference to their dress code.” Ms. Fletcher points out.

The primping and priming that Kim and Kerry agree on, is a major incentive for attending the event. The economic flow-on affects a myriad of other industries such as hairdressers, manicurists; make up artists and so forth. We are given a Public Holiday to attend and play our role in its success.

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Kim Fletchers headpiece that she dons sprouts red flowers that move whimsically in the breeze. In contrast Kerrie Stanley wears perky bud ariels reminiscing pixie ears.