Category Archives: Melbourne Talent

FULTON STREET band

Australian Blues

An A+ Melbourne band, Fulton Street is Smooth, Smart and Sophisticated. The purple Vinyl spins throughout the day, filling the lazy Sunday with a rich ambience. This band is beyond an emerging band of young musicians, as the finished quality of their sound begs disbelief. 

FULTON STREET interview with Shannen Wick; Lead Singer. 

 The Start

I started Fulton Street in 2012 with our drummer, Daniel. We studied Indonesian language together at Monash Univeristy, and it wasn’t until we were forced to work together on a group assignment that we both discovered we had a passion for music. After smashing an oral exam, we decided to start a band. We placed ads up all around campus, asking for anyone to join our soul/funk outfit. It was another 6 months before we had found a crew that was committed to our idea of writing and performing originals. Soon, we were being booked for gigs but we didn’t have a band name. Our then saxophonist, Hanna suggested that we name ourselves Fulton Street – the name of the street we rehearsed on every Monday night for about 4 years.

Australian Influences

We’ve been influenced for many years now by the sounds of Daptone Records – Sharon Jones and The Dap-Kings, Charles Bradley, Menahan Street Band, Budos Band, etc.  Recently, we’ve discovered the amazing artists coming out of Colemine Records too. Locally, our musical heroes include: The Bamboos, Cookin’ On 3 Burners, The Putbacks and The Meltdown. We’re very lucky to have worked with and even been taught by some of these local legends!

Family

Both sides of my family are claiming I get my voice from them, haha. My whole family loves to sing. We have a couple of guitarists in the family too. Music has always been apart of my life ever since I can remember, but apart from my great-uncle, no one has pursued a career in music – except for me.

Check Yourself!

‘Check Yourself’ was written during the US elections, 2016.  At the time, I was seeing and hearing a lot about migrant family separation, and the disturbing impact of displacement and alienation faced by those affected children. Jamie and I wanted to write a song, urging future generations to take complete ownership of their race, skin colour, religious beliefs, etc. We wanted to challenge everyone to let go of their judgments for a better future.

Our Generation

I feel that young people are not often listened to and are often underrepresented. If you think about the current political climate, how many young voices do you see or hear? It’s a shame – I think young people have a lot to offer in terms of fresh new ideas, and helping us move forward in this ever-changing world.

Are you happy with the Album? MP

We’re super happy with the release! We’ve learnt a lot from our first ‘soul baby’ and Ivan Khatchoyan (Cookin’ On 3 Burners, The Traffic) was an amazing mentor and producer throughout the whole process. Our next single has already been tracked, but that won’t be released for a little while yet. We’re still enjoying the ride that ‘Problems & Pain’ is taking us on.  

Where do you see yourself in 5 years? MP
It’s crazy how fast the last 6 years have gone! I’m hoping that in 5 years time, Fulton Street will still be playing, continuing to develop our sound and stage performance, writing and releasing music, and touring!

What are some of the challenges that you have faced? MP
I manage Fulton Street. I book our gigs. I write our songs. I’m also the front lady. I never studied Business, Events or Music. So, there are always new challenges I’m faced with in the running of the band! But it’s all a big learning curve, and I am a huge believer in that you ‘learn by doing.’ The guys are always supportive. Thankfully, we also have a lot of musician friends and mentors who have guided us and given us advice when we’ve needed it!
Fulton Street is quite a large group. There can be anywhere between 7 to 12 people involved in our live shows. We all juggle study, work, rehearsal and other gig commitments. But at the end of the day, we all make the band our priority, and I think that’s why we work so well. We’re in a niche little market in terms of the soul/funk scene. There’s not a huge demand for it. But at the end of the day, if we write music with a positive social message and give our 110% onstage, people will take notice.

Are you planning a tour, local or o/seas?MP
We’d love to do a regional and interstate tour, so hopefully we can get that happening in the next few months. I think our long-term goal would be to head overseas for recording and touring.

You played Fed Square on New Years, how did that come about and what was the night like? MP
Multicultural Arts Victoria contacted us about playing Federation Square for New Years Eve, 2017. The atmosphere on that night was incredible. We’d finish playing a song and the cheers from the audience would just wash over the stage in waves. It is definitely a show and NYE we’ll never forget.

 

by April Forward.

New Album Problems & Pain

A Snippet of the Fringe

Three Artists, three stages, 3 fabulous hours

‘Existentialism the uniqueness and isolation of the individual experience in a hostile or indifferent universe, regards human existence as unexplainable, and stresses freedom of choice and responsibility for the consequences of one’s acts.’

THE PERFORMANCE

SAUCE

image

Simon Godfrey’s Dadaistic comedy is a complex ,high energy, minimalist work, marked by the absurd.

“Let us take the rest of Ukraine”

There are over a dozen characters in Simon Godfrey’s ‘Sauce’, each distinctive and brilliantly performed, in his one-man show. He needs nothing more than his imagination to bewitch. Godfrey turns a condiment into a high stakes adventure. He is a force.

 GENDER SPANNER

image

If you can fix a pipe are you an old man or a little girl? Jessica McKerlie ‘throws a spanner’ into gender prejudice. What defines our sexuality, is it our body or our mind? Can a woman who believes she is a man become a transsexual? McKerlie challenges the status quo of being, in a solo show. It’s an exploration into our humanity, told with tricks and slips.

“Don’t confuse my sex with my gender”

Her eyes flash into the souls of the audience as she keeps them tittering on the edge.

“Thank you for letting me label you.”

DEAR DIARY

image

Andi Snelling got a standing applause for her solo performance, as a girl growing through the banal experiences that ‘rocked her world’. The witty script compounded a couple of decades with multi-media and song, whist exploring the philosophy of time and self. Snelling mocked the self-indulgence of the autobiography, that the audience related to, with bursts of laughter.

“Guess what? I found four dollars at Timezone!”

It was a beautifully crafted work, packed with clever charm and brilliant timing.

The Mother of Stunt Man

“Never say never to Jade.” Jan explains

Jan’s son, Jade Amantea constantly tests the boundaries of fear, he is a stunt man who loves risk. She has learnt to deal with the lifestyle that her son has chosen. She is proud of his achievements and knows that he is living his extreme life with pure satisfaction.

Stuntman Jade

Jade’s career began as a teenager when he debuted on the TV program, Neighbours. Since then, he has jumped off buildings and drove recklessly through a catalogue of blockbusters. Jade Amantea is known for his work on Knowing (2009), The Wolverine (2013) and Predestination (2014). He is currently in Queensland with Johnny Depp working on the Pirates of the Caribbean.

The path Jade chose did not come without personal challenges and a crisis. As a child Jade had asthma but he did not let this prevent him from attending gymnastics, an activity that his mum encouraged. It was when he was practising somersault stunts, on a trampoline, that Jade twisted and fell badly on his leg.

His mother got the shocking news and demanded that no surgery be done on him until she could locate the best medical professionals to perform the operation. It was a delay that saved his leg. The surgeon told Jade that he would have to choose another career but he was resolved, to have a full recovery.

“It was through his determination, the support of his family, his girlfriend Stephie and his physio that he got back to where he was.” Jan sighs.

Jan is acutely aware of the risks that her son embraces. She winces when she sees him on fire, run down buildings and jump through basketball hoops. It’s not the life of an average mother.

“Its nerve racking but I’m very proud of him” Jan calmly states.

He began driving on his grandfather’s knee, back at the farm, where Jan grew up. He had his first motorbike when most children were given pushbikes. When Jade drives his mum, he likes to tease her with the occasional spin. Jan has learnt to hold on.

“He is a great driver, he can drive anything.” She states proudly.

Jade grew up in an environment that allowed him to develop strong physical ability. Jan encouraged his gymnastics, and continues to advocate it as an activity for children; she prefers it to group sports. It does not require a dependency on others and helps build children’s self esteem.

“Every kid should do gymnastics, they learn how to fall; how to look after their bodies and what muscles they have.” She explains.

Jade lives in the fast lane and loves it. His family and friends support him, and watch his feats with their hearts racing.

(photo courtesy of Jade Amantea)